Visit Rome

Trastevere neighborhood in Rome’s historic center

Trastevere name comes from the Latin trans Tiberim, meaning literally “beyond the Tiber”. Trastevere maintains its character thanks to its narrow cobbled streets lined by medieval houses. The neighborhood has traditionally attracted artists, so it’s possible to find unique gifts in its boutiques and studios.

The center of public life in the neigbhorhood is the Piazza di Santa Maria in Trastevere, a large square outside of the church of Santa Maria in Trastevere. Also on the square is an ancient octagonal fountain that was restored by Carlo Fontana in the 17th century.

Other attractions in Trastevere include the church of Santa Cecilia in Trastevere, which contains some notable medieval as well as Baroque works of art, the Museo di Roma in Trastevere, which houses interesting archives of Roman civic life from the 18th and 19th centuries and, in Piazza Trilussa, the statue of Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli, a poet who penned his works in the Roman dialect and who is particularly loved in Trastevere.

Nowadays, Trastevere maintains its character thanks to its narrow cobbled streets lined by ancient houses. At night, natives and tourists alike flock to its many pubs and restaurants, but much of the original character of Trastevere remains.

The unique character of this neighborhood has attracted artists, foreign expats, and many famous people. In the sixties and seventies, the American musicians/composers Frederic Rzewski and Richard Teitelbaum, of the group Musica Elettronica Viva, lived in Via della Luce. Sergio Leone, the director of Spaghetti Westerns, grew up in Viale Glorioso (there is a marble plaque to his memory on the wall of the apartment building), and went to a Catholic private school in the neighborhood. Ennio Morricone, the film music composer, went to the same school, and for one year was in the same class as Sergio Leone.

@photo KP

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